Category Archives: Miscellaneous

SMEG CS19ID-6 Range: another defect

It seems my SMEG kitchen range is getting older… at least it is again showing some issues. The right hand side front induction field is sometimes coming on, intermittently, only to shut off quickly again. Normal operation is no problem, but when it is switched off, it doesn’t remain fully switched off all the time. Could be dangerous if some pot is left on the induction field, and the range decides to switch it on by itself… a praise to all the old-fashioned switches that completely took power off the appliance.

First we need to find out the source of the issue, is the it controls electronics, or the switch? To test, I opened up the front panel (easy enough, it is just 8 screws…), and switched the cables going to two of the front panel switches. And, as it turns out, the issue also switched. So it is probably a defective switch rather than any issue with the electronics. That’s good news.

For about 35 EUR, I got a new switch, as it turns out, it is no switch put a potentiometer…

… and a quick exchange fixed the issue. Now let’s do some study of the old part.

Made by printing some conductive composite on a circuit board. Looking good. I can’t see any issue with it even under the microscope. Maybe just some contact issue, the contacts also don’t look clean.

So I will clean it all up thoroughly, bent the contacts a bit to give it slightly more force, and keep it as a spare.

These potentiometers aren’t cheap, at least the use good engineering plastics for it, like, glass fiber reinforced materials.

A Japanese hot pot: A hot spring without a hot spring

One of the most famous features of Japan is the availability of hot spring all around the country. If this is an advantage or disadvantage of my new living place in Germany remains yet to be seen, because the hot water close to the surface normally comes along with other earth activity including volcanos and earthquakes… Anyway, I have no source of hot water here other than by gas heating, so at least I wanted to have an outdoor bath resembling Japanese style.

The pot is handmade from high alumina clay, fired at about 1350°C, and shipped from famous Jingdezhen, Jiangxi China, within about 8 weeks. It is a heavy pot, about 350 kg. It resembles the Japanese made bath pots 1:1 but the price is much more competitive and a certain Ms. Wei of the pot company knows how to deal with foreign customers and can manage export of such items as a routine business… Transportation fees in Germany and customs duties, taxes turned out to be more costly than the pot itself.

The essential elements are, (1) the pot, (2) the piping system all made from DN40 glue-fitting PVC-U pipe, (3) a circulation pump (180 Watts, Wiltec 51554, including a filter/strainer), (4) a gas heater (fired by Propan), (5) hot water supply pipe – this is constructed such that it can be drained easily in winter after each use, so it is possible to have a bath also in freezing conditions, made from 18 mm copper pipe and fed by the main hot water system of the house (using natural gas), (6) a regulator system to keep stable temperature.

The water heater has a safety system to switch off the heater after 20 minutes of use, and it has a built-in electric ignition system powered by 2 batteries, 1.5 Volts each. In order to achieve temperature regulation without interfering with the internal circuit of the gas heater, I just switch on and off the 3 V power to the heater.

Normally the heater is only used to keep the water at constant temperature of about 42°C (Japanese baths are really hot…), which takes less than 20 min on-time, anyway, I decided to add a timer circuit that interrupts the heater ever 15 minutes for 30 seconds. So essentially, it can continuously heat the bath even when filling in cold water. Normally the bath is started with reasonably hot water from the house main supply.

Unfortunately, the ignition system by high voltage causes the regulator to hang up. The high voltage sparks change the ground potential it seems, and even some attempts with protection and clean-up circuits (low pass filters) had no permanent effect, when powered from a single supply that is split to 12 V the regulator/timer, and 3 V for the heater. So I now powder the unit from two completely separate powder adapters, and two completely separated circuits, isolated by mechanical relay.

The voltage regulator for 3 V is a simple LM317 circuit, with some more capacitors and features to protect it from any surge voltages.

The temperature regulator and timer, sure you could build it yourself with some microcontroller, display, etc, but no need as the complete module is available for less than 3 EUR mail-order.

The water circuit has the circulation pump. Note that not all the water is passing through the heat, only a certain portion, and pressure is generated by an orifice in parallel with the heater. Temperature sensing is done in the circulation loop. In winter the circulation system can be completely drained and switched-off by appropriate ball valves. So you can still have a bath, but you just can’t heat it by the circulation system (rather need to add more hot water, or just limit the bath to 1 hour or so).

The heat loss seems to be about 1 kW, so we need to run the heater that is using about 1.2-1.4 kg of propane per hour of operation only for some minutes at a time (1 kg propane has about 14 kWh of energy, and we may assume an efficiency of 0.7). Experience shows that is this correct, the heater may switch on every 15-20 minutes of so for about 3 minutes.

Now the system is completely automatic. In normal usage there is no need to adjust any regulators. Just fill in water and switch the bath main switch to “ON”.

Lastly, the water is not just plain tap water but sure enough I am adding bath salts composed such that they resemble my favorite Yamaguchi prefecture hot spring pretty well!

Heating energy consumption: first evaluations, and total annual energy demand

In the meantime, I have collected enough consumption data for gas consumption (mostly heating, some little bits for hot water), and at various temperatures outdoors, including, very cold temperatures.

As it turns out, the gas consumption correlates well with the outside temperature (daily average temperature in 2 m height, as officially recorded close to my place by the weather authorities).

With datasets of daily temperatures for 2019 and 2020, we can then estimate the total gas consumption of these years.

The 2019 predicted consumption:

The 2020 predicted consumption:

For German standards, everything less than 100 kWh per m2 and year is quite reasonable. I need to admit that not all of the rooms are fully heated all the time, but well, it is not all that bad, comfortable, and affordable.

Here an energy rating chart – in German – around 100 is a good value, above 200 … there it is getting really bad, wasteful and expensive!

Christmas Time: Honigkuchen (honey based cookies)

It is a long time favorite, and easily stores for some months – honey based cookies. Here is a good recipe.

500 g Honey
125 g Sugar
150 g Water (you may just add some more Honey if you don’t like to add refined sugar, but it makes the dough easier workable)
1 kg wheat flour (can be some coarser type wheat flour)
60-80 g Spice including anise, clove etc., a ready purchased mixture. Adjust quantity to strength of spice and your taste
25 g Ammoniumbicarbonate (“Hirschhornsalz”)
Pottash can also be added, by I didn’t add it, it will make the cookies flat.

First, mix and melt honey, water, sugar, at low heat. Add the other ingredients and work firmly. Let it rest for 2 or 3 days in the fridge (cover to avoid drying out).

Then, prepare cookies, and bake at about 200 degC for 8-10 minutes. These need to be well baked. Underside can be dark brown, but don’t burn them to bitterness.

The Honigkuchen can be stored in a well-closed container for 2 or 3 months no problem.

A major move, and a defective CATV splitter

After returning from Japan to Germany early October, I decided to move to a new place, a larger property with ample workshop space and gardens.

Needless to say, a major effort with tons of heavy test equipment and other stuff piled up…

Apart from the heavy lifting, apart from tap water, electricity and a tight roof, a fast internet connection is the most essential thing. This took quite some more effort than expected. First, the grounding system of the house needed an upgrade (otherwise the internet cable company would refuse to install their amplifiers and cable modem), and, that done, there was not enough signal going in and out the house to allow for the 1 Gb/s connection…. first, they changed all the stuff inside of the house, a full upgrade, but to no avail, finally, they marked a spot on the sidewalk.

Only hours later, strong men showed up, digging up the ground in the search for the internet…

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The connection here is delivered on CATV coaxial line for the last mile, so there is main line about 50 cm underneath the sidewalk, and there are taps/splitters, usually one splitter serving two houses.

From what I can tell, it is a 2x 15 dB tap, a quite common part in the CATV network. It took the crew just about half an hour to install. Great job.

The part, here is a clean shot, it has the connectors already mounted, and in the field, the cables are merely inserted and heatshrink tubing applied.

There are now a few interesting left-behinds, an old CATV house connection box with filters, I will test it out once there is more time.

After the installation job had been done one the road, it took just another two visits of the cable company to get all up and running! At least, they managed to do all this in less than a week.

SMEG CS19ID-6 Range: cold food only….

Recently, big disaster. My cooking range failed, not quite completely, but the right two of 5 induction hobs. It is not just a plain range, but a high end version large range, made in Italy…

It took a while to figure out how to disassemble it, and at a first glance, nothing visible, so I put it back together, and started to investigate the professional repair services…. quotations ranging from 900 EUR minimum, to 1500 EUR average cost to fix the error “E-5” that is now showing on the display.
Before going forward with the repair, I got some single hot plate so that at least cooking can continue, while dealing with a potentially lengthy repair.

A proper repair is done in a workshop, so I took out the whole hob assembly.

Upon close inspection, the filter assembly has a blown trace. It is a PCB trace acting as a fuse…

The copper of the trace deposited on the plastic cover nearby.

Fortunatly, the manufacturer, E.G.O. (a very famous German enterprise that makes most of the European induction range drivers) provided already a fuse holder to fit a US type 20 Amp slow-blow fuse.

Checking around, the left two IGBTs, IXGR40N60C2D1 are completely short.

That’s the full assembly, 74.470.061, with capacitors, a rectifier, and 2 IGBTs per hob.

For the time being, waiting for spare parts (ordered several more spares, and several fuses, just in case….). The IGBTs desoldered nicely, and I also checked the rectifier and all the diodes around, nothing suspicious.

Delicious Apple Muffins

This a well time-proven recipe, and will yield 20 mid-size muffins.

500 g wheat flour
3/4 package baking powder (about 10 g will be sufficient)
165 g sugar
a little bit of salt
1 small and flat teaspoon of ground cinnamon

All the dry material, mix them well, and best pass all through a flour screener.

Cut two large apples into small pieces, or use 3 small apples. Don’t store them for a long time, as they will turn brown. Best use some firm apples, not overly ripe or soggy.

Heat up the oven to 180 degC.

To the dry mixture, add 250 mL milk, 90 g of neutral taste oil (also works with 90 g of soft margarine). 2 Eggs.

Mix the dough well. Then add the cut apples, and mix well again.

Fill the dough into muffin papers (in some holders of metal form), fill to almost full, but don’t spill the dough (use 2 spoons for best results).

Immediately bake in the pre-heated over, for about 30 minutes.

Let cool down. You may apply some heated/liquified jam or glazing, but I just eat these plain, and also kids like it that way.

Banana Muffin: sooo delicious, and we don’t add any chocolate

I use this blog for various purposes, including, not to forget the well-proven recipes and to make them available for your use, if you like.

This time, we have banana muffins. There are many recipes on the internet, but none that is really as easy as this one, and that works without a mixer or other equipment.

First of all, take about

5 bananas (large), or 6 bananas (middle size) – best some really ripe bananas.
120 g butter and/or margarine (I use 80 g margarine, and 40 g butter in Japan because butter is in short supply), unsalted butter of course.
4 eggs.

The bananas cut them up a bit and use a fork to make to uniform mass. Then mix well with the nearly molten (but not hot) butter and eggs.

Then, prepare a mixture of

300 g all purpose flour
1 package vanilin sugar, or some vanilla essence.
2/3 of a pack of baking powder, about 8 to 10 g
170 g sugar
1 little bit of salt

Mix all this well as a dry powder, or put it all through a sieve if you have.

Then mix the liquid mixture, and the dry mixture well and fill into muffin papers in their forms or trays. This will yield 20 pieces. Don’t overfill, form needs to be filled to about 6 mm below the surface only.

I am baking these in a professional deck oven, 180 degC upper, 175 degC lower temperature. For 25 minutes. Sure you can use other ovens at some similar heat.

After baking, you can enjoy these immediately after cooling. May apply some powdered sugar, icing sugar, as you like.

Oooh. So delicious.

Recipe: Pickled Garlic (and other mixed local vegetables)

This year was a good year for garlic, and all other kinds of vegetable that can handle dry (and hot!) conditions. Here is my preferred recipe for conserving these goodies for winter time:

Take about 20 bulbs of garlic
Red hot peppers (home-grown), as may as you have jars, or depending on size, some more.
3-4 mid size zucchini (from your own garden, or a friend’s garden) – remove soft inner part, cut into cube size about 3/4″
Onions, about 8 pieces, cut into irregular shapes

The jars, provide enough mid-size jars which need to be perfectly clean (best clean in dishwasher before use, even if they were cleaned before), and sterilize in boiling water (both the jars and the lids) for several minutes. Hint: add some distilled vinegar to the water to avoid formation of deposits.

For the liquid
Take 1 Liter of water, 200 mL of 25% acid white distilled vinegar, 160 g sugar, 30 g salt – bring to a boil.

Add the vegetables.

Add quantity of black pepper seeds.

Make sure that all vegetables are fully covered with the liquid, otherwise, add more liquid, or less vegetables.

Boil vigorously for at least 8 minutes.

Transfer to the jars, fill the to the top, put on the lid immediately and turn upside down (lid side down). All this must be done with boiling hot liquid and vegetables, so take care. Ensure that all jars have at least one pepper, and somewhat even balance of vegetables.

Let cool down slowly, label and store for several weeks before eating.

It is a pretty strong liquid, and it is very suitable for preserving other strong vegetables like, onion, garlic, chili, etc., and these preserve will keep several years no problem – if want to preserve light vegetables like pure zucchini, pumpkin, gherkins, etc. – lower acid concentration is advisable.

Recipe: German Küchle

One of the traditional baked goods in the Southern part of Germany: so-called Kuechle.

Recipe:
500 g wheat flour, 50 g sugar, 60 g butter, 2 eggs, 220-250 mL milk, small quantity of salt, yeast.

Prepare a yeast dough, knead it thoroughly, let it rise, knead again, and finally form small round pieces, about 15 pieces. Let rise again for 15 minutes.

For baking, heat oil (better: clarified butter) to 175-185 degrees C (ideally, use a thermometer). Then, with fingers covered with some oil or butter, pull the kuechle into shape and bake floating on the oil, turn around once the color of the 1st side is right, bake the 2nd side, then take out and put on some kitchen paper to soak-off the residual oil. Cover with some powdered sugar. Eat fresh, or freeze.